Home > 013994. George Hubbard, 013995. Mary --- > Genealogy of Hubbard and Bogel Families of Presidio County, Texas

Genealogy of Hubbard and Bogel Families of Presidio County, Texas

Source: Harry J. Hubbard, Jr., The Genealogy of Hubbard and Bogel Families of Presidio County, Texas, Their Ancestors and Descendants, 1600-1989 (El Paso[?]: published by the author, 1990).  [WorldCat]

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George HUBBARD

George HUBBARD was born in Galstonbury, Somersetshire, England about 1600.  He married Mary BISHOP, daughter of John and Ann BISHOP in England in 1627.  George, accompanied by his family, prbably landed in Watertown, Massachusetts about 1633.

On 6 May 1635 the General Court of Massachusetts Bay granted the inhabitants of Watertown permission to “remove themselves to any place that they shall think meete to make choice of, provided they continue under this government.”  The reason being that there were too many towns and increasing numbers of cattle.  On 15 October 1635, George and his family joined about sixty men, women and children with their cattle, horses and pigs as they commenced their difficult journey toward Connecticut.

In 1636 George HUBBARD and Samuel WAKEMAN surveyed along the Connecticut River from Windsor to the Falls (Chicopee?) and from Wethersfield to the mouth of the (Connecticut) River.  Wethersfield comprised a fifty square mile parallelogram straddling the River.  In 1639, George, by survey, cut out that portion lying east of the Connecticut River from the Hartford line to the Sturgeon River.  This eastern portion, about 1690, was named Glastonbury (Wethersfield to the west of the River).  In this area George laid out forty-four “Three mile lots.”  His comprising one hundred ninety-five acres, was number 14 in Glastonbury.  To the east was wilderness.

George represented Wethersfield in the first Colonial General Court.  After three years in Wethersfield, George, with a number of his neighbors, moved to Milford, Connecticut where George was granted Milford Island.  He was admitted to the church on 15 January 1644.

George sold Milford Island and moved to Guilford, Connecticut where he bought property from Jacob SHEAFFE on 22 September 1648.  On 6 October 1650 he was admitted to the Guilford church as a member.  He served for many years as a Deputy Magistrate. in 1666-7 he was a member of the Assembly at the union of the Hartford and New Haven Colonies.  In May 1670 the Court invested him with the authority to “joyne persons in marriage.”

After outstanding contributions to communities in the Connecticut River Valley, George died in January 1683.  His will, dated 23 May 1682, is filed, pages 96-7, Volume I, Probate Office Records, New Haven, Connecticut.  There is a 30 December 1682 codicil.  The inventory, dated 30 may 1683, lists 564 pounds, 08 shillings, 06 pence.  Mary died in Guilford, New Haven County on 14 September 1675.  Both are believed to be buried in the Guilford village green (formerly the cemetery).  (Information taken from pp. 199-205,”One Thousand Years of HUBBARD History, 866-1895,” Edward Warren Day, 1895.  “Considerably, from a huge manuscript volume filed in the town clerk’s office of Guilford (CT)”.  Vol. 9 “American Ancestry,” Jane Hubbard Lloyd).

George HUBBARD, surveyor, and author’s antecedent, Thomas HOOKER, must have been acquainted.  George and his family moved to what was to become the Hartford, Connecticut area (Wethersfield) in 1635.  Thomas HOOKER moved to the area he and his group founded as Hartford in 1636.  Both the Hartford and Wethersfield people, in small adjacent communities, had similar objectives, that is, com-

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munity organization, division of lands, use of river waters, farming and, most importantly, freedom.  George and Thomas HOOKER were active participants in carrying out the objectives.

John HUBBARD

John HUBBARD, eldest son of George and Mary BISHOP HUBBARD, was born in England about 1630 and came with his parents to America (Watertown, Massachusetts) about 1633 (“One Thousand Years of HUBBARD History, 866-1895,” Edward Warren Day, 1895).  John married Mary SHEAFE, cousin of Mary SHEAFE MERRIAM, wife of Robert MERRIAM of Concord, Massachusetts.  The two Mary SHEAFE’s, one married to a MERRIAM, may have given rise to the confusion regarding the identity of John HUBBARD’s wife.

[Mary SHEAFE: The family name of John HUBBARD’s wife has been controversial.  The Hatfield, Massachusetts memorial stele, inscribed “Mary MERRIAM,” was set about one hundred eighty-five years after Mary’s death, therefore, may not be correct.  Page 213, “One Thousand Years of HUBBARD History” by Harlan Page Hubbard is inconclusive.  The New England Historic Genealogical Society does not support the name Mary MERRIAM, but presents evidence, pages 339-40, The HUBBARD Family, “The Ancestry of Samuel, Freda and John WARNER” by Frederick Chester Warner, 1949 that Mary SHEAFE, daughter of Thomas SHEAFE, Cranbrook County, Kent, England was John’s wife.  Thomas SHEAFE was a first cousin of Mary SHEAFE MERRIAM of Concord, Massachusetts who is buried beside her husband, Robert, in Hill Burying Ground, Concord.  The Robert MERRIAMs were childless.  According to page 2734, Vol. IV, “Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of the State of Massachusetts,” by W.R. Cutter, 1910, the wills of Robert MERRIAM and his wife, Mary, 11 February 1686/7, both name Jonathan HUBBARD, John’s son, “cosen.”]

The John HUBBARDs lived for a few years in Concord where Robert MERRIAM owned farm property.  John then moved to Wethersfield.  On 18 April 1659 he agreed to move with other members of the community to Hadley, Massachusetts.  He was made a freeman on 26 March 1661.  After 1672 he moved to Hatfield, Massachusetts, where he died in the home of his son, Isaac, in 1702 (“One Thousand Years of HUBBARD History, 866-1895,” pp. 213-214).  A verse on John HUBBARD’s stele reads:

“My glass is run my life is spent
My earthly temple was but bent
Why should I wish a length of years
To spend in such a vale of tears”

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