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Fred W. Wears – A Funeral Eulogy

5 June 2009 Leave a comment

Source: Fred W. Wears (a funeral eulogy, unpublished, 1957), from the papers of Doris Marietta Colley.

FRED W. WEARS

Fred W. WEARS was born at Mt. Zion, Missouri, on May 4, 1887, and died at the Clinton General Hospital at 4:25 p.m., June 28, 1957, following an illness of four weeks and one day.  He was seventy years, one month and twenty-four days of age at the time of his passing.

On April 9, 1916, he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Jane CARVER of Lowry City.  To this union five children were born.  ^They are as follows: Mrs. Doris COLLEY of Kansas City, Missouri; Major L.  ^Leo Glenn WEARS of San Diego, California; Mrs. Helen ^Jusha JUCHET of Kansas City, Missouri; John E. WEARS of Kansas City, Missouri; and Harold G. WEARS of Kansas City, Missouri.  He is also survived by one sister, Mrs. W.H. BAGLEY of Kansas City, Kansas, and four grandchildren.

In young manhood Fred WEARS learned the barber trade and followed that line of work for the remainder of his life, except for a short period when he was employed at the Lake City Arsenal during World War II.  He followed his trade for brief intervals in Colorado, Oklahoma, and Kansas, but spent the greater part of his working days here in Lowry City, his home town.  For a number of years since the war he has been employed part time in the Hinkle barber shop.

Fred WEARS was a quiet, friendly man, well liked by those who knew him.  He was a good husband and father and will be greatly missed, not only by the members of the bereaved family, but by a host of friends in the Lowry City community.

Amy Tanner, family history, undated

1 June 2009 Leave a comment

Source: Amy Tanner, family history, undated.

The Mattocks family were settlers around Momence. They came from Vermont when Grandfather Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks was quite young. He had 3 brothers and 2 sisters. The brothers were Edwin, Monroe & Walter (Walter must have been the youngest as he visited us about 1910. Momence. He was the only one of the 6 living then.[)] The sisters were Adelaide M. & Abba (Mattocks) Force. Their parents were Ichabod & Matilda Mattocks. They are buried in Shrontz Cemetery Momence. Our grandfather is also buried there. There may be more information on the tombstones. (South west corner of cemetery near some evergreen trees.)

Grandfather Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks was born at Bennington, Vermont in 1827. He died in 1892.

Bennington is along the Walloomsac River (branch of Hudson). He (grandfather) was married to Hester Ann Hess also of Momence. Their children were Walter Andrew Mattocks (that’s Uncle Walter) & William Eugene Mattocks (our father).

After the civil war, they separated. Grandmother married Lucien Jones (Aunt Cora (Jones) Scott’s parents[)]

Grandfather married Abigail Perry (Aunt Abbie’s parents)

Aunt Ida & Uncle Walter were buried at Hobart, Ind.

I don’t know what became of the Grandmothers (I’ll guess) Hester Ann probably Momence, Abigail Kankakee or Aroma

Wm Eugene Mattocks was born April 17, 1861 at Momence, Ill.

He married Anna Mary (Fedde) Mattocks in 1885

Our mother was born in Blankenmoor, Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, Oct. 16, 1864. She died Sept. 5, 1943.

Our father died Sept. 1, 1906.

Their children: (six of us)

Andrew Cyrus, Lake Village, Ind. Feb. 17, 1887 – Nov. 1960

Katie Idella (West Creek near Lowell, Ind.) Oct. 24, 1888 – Sept. 25, 1962

Clara Mabel (Chicago) April 22, 1892 –

Amy Emily (Morocco, Ind.) Aug. 3, 1898

Anna Lorraine (Fair Oakes, Ind.) May 8, 1901 – died fall of 1904 (she was buried at Koutz, Ind.[)]

Walter Clarence born June 7, 1904 at Koutz, Ind.

Fred George Tanner born Kankakee June 3, 1892, married March 17, 1934, died Apr. 21, 1953.

Our mother was buried at Creston, Ind. (near Lowell). Her mother, Uncle John, Aunt Katie & uncle Ed Meyers are also there at Creston. Uncle Henry at Lowell, Ind. (Her two brothers John & Henry & sister Katie & husband.) Maybe the sister Margaret & husband too (Joe Fedde a dist. cousin). These had a daughter Minnie (Fedde) Beckers who lived in Prairie Elk, Minnesota.

Grandfather Cyrus R. Mattocks & 3 brothers enlisted in the Civil War.

From Kankakee County

Edwin Mattocks – 42nd Illinois Infantry, Company D.

Monroe Mattocks – 42nd Ill. Inf., Company D.

  • Organized in Chicago, July 22, 1861
  • reenlisted Jan. 1, 1864
  • Mustered out Dec. 16, 1865 Chicago
  • Final discharge Jan 13, 1866

Cyrus R. Mattocks – 113th Illinois Infantry Co. K from Kankakee County

Walter Mattocks 113th Ill. Inf. Co. K ” ”

  • Both enlisted Aug. 1862.
  • Mustered out June 20, 1865.
  • Final discharge June 25, 1865.

All four were in marches & battles all over the South. Edwin, Monroe & Walter all went to Kansas so we lost track of them.

Granfather Claus Fedde was born in Germany 1821. Died in Germany 1869.

[Sofia?] A little sister of mothers age 3 yrs. also died & was buried in Germany.

Grandmother Anje (Antja) (Clefdt[?]) Fedde was born in Germany 1823.

Grandmother came to America with the three youngest, Anna age 8, Henry (older than 8), John (younger than 8) in 1872. There were 2 older daughters Katie & Margaret who were already in America & married. Grandmother lived in Sherburnville, Ill., where the 3 went to school & were confirmed in St. Petersburg Lutheran church. She was a seamstress, made ladies dresses & men’s suits. She died in 1892. She was then living with daughter Anna when the folks lived at 63rd & Halsted St. & (William) our dad drove horses on street cars in Chicago, during the World’s Fair.

Amy Tanner to Louise Schmidt, letter, 1 May 1979

31 May 2009 Leave a comment

Source: Amy Tanner to Louise Schmidt, letter, 1 May 1979.

I was sure our grandfather Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks was born in Bennington, Vermont. – Icabod and Matilda were our great grandparents – mother spoke of them as Icabod and Matilda. During my school days, I began to wonder: did they inspire those names in “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”? Did Washington Irving know them? I think I have seen the names on tombstones in Shrontz Cemetery (approx 5 miles east of Momence) next to Grandfather Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks. It seems so real to me but I haven’t been to Shrontz Cemetery since about 1920. The grave stones were toward the south-west corner of the cemetery as it was then. There were other stones there too. As I recall, it looked like a family lot. That is where our father should have been buried, I think.

The four brothers were in service from Kankakee County. We have a “History of Kankakee County” 1906 edition. They are all in that, but only the war records.

I remember hearing the names Abigail and Adelaide but nothing about Josephine. I think Abigail was married to Harv Force. I don’t remember ever hearing of a John; maybe he didn’t come to Illinois and father and mother were not acquainted with him. I’ve heard the family came in a covered wagon to Illinois, had lived in N.Y. at sometime and claimed some Penn. Dutch ancestry. I remember that about 1913 or 1915 Aunt Abbie (Boswell) spent a year or two in Rutland, Vermont. She was with relatives there. She went there after the Boswells – her uncle Charlie and Aunt Phianna died. They had adopted her when her mother, Abigail Perry, Grandfather Mattocks second wife died, and Aunt Abbie was very young. Her Aunt Phianna was her mother’s sister.

In his late years grandfather lived with his sons, his last year with our parents. My grandparents were all gone before my day. Grandmother Fedde lived her last days with our folks too when they lived in Chicago, 1891 and 1892 – at 63rd and Halsted. She died about that time. Clara was born there. My father drove horses that pulled the street cars and cared for the horses and barns. I was born in Morocco, Indiana, so by 1898 they were back this way.

Our Grandmother Hester Ann Hess died when our father was very young (5 or 6 years old). He had no permanent home. He lived with his Uncle Rastus Wells, Aunt Polly Jones, Aunt Miranda, Uncle Rube Hess, the Sherwoods, the West’s, the Parrishes – names I recall hearing and with his father at times. When his sons married, Grandfather Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks gave each son a cow for milk. When we lived on the Merrill Farm, Mahlin Hess lived just S.E. from where you lived – a mile south and a mile east. I think he was Grandmother’s brother, about the last of the old timers I knew of.

Bates County Missouri Cemeteries 1980

26 May 2009 Leave a comment

Source: E.J. Christiansen, Bates County Missouri Cemeteries 1980, Volume 1 (Clinton, Missouri: The Printery, 1980).

[page 351]

OAK HILL CEMETERY – M.P.

This Oak Hill Cemetery lies in Mount Pleasant (thus the designation M.P.) Township, Sec. 23.  It lies just east of town of Butler on H. Hwy.

[…]

11. Clarence E. HOUGH        1911 – 1968

Edna M.            1914 –

[…]

20. Wilbur E. DONNER        1913 – 1964

Sgt. WW II            1913 – 1964

[377]

705. Mrs. L.B. HOUGH

706. E.M. DANNER        4 Oct. 1909

707. Daniel FISHER        1821 – 1891

Lucy FISHER            1845 – 1911

708. Illegible

C.H. FORD, son of John FORD

Tod FISHER

P.M. GATES

Co D 7th Ill Inf.

R.E.-d

Illegible

J.M. SCOFFIELD

Co C 18th Pa Cav.

Mrs. SCOFFIELD

Bulah DANNER                   1918

Millie Dunn SEWARD        1863 – 1928

[page 385]

948. E.H. HUFF            1890 – 1958

Pvt. U.S. Army WW I

Lola B. HUFF            1896 –

[page 568]

PAPINVILLE CEMETERY

[…]

67.  Albert D. HOUGH        26 Dec. 1915 – 6 Dec. 1918

Pereza M. HOUGH        28 Apr. 1917 – Dec. 1918

Luster Earl Colley to Gregg Leon Mattocks, letter, 14 October 1997

9 May 2009 Leave a comment

Source: Luster Earl Colley to Gregg Leon Mattocks, letter, 14 October 1997.

October 14, 1997

Dear Gregg:

Oma sequestered all my birthday greeting mail that arrived before my birthday party.  some way, your card got by her.  So I got it directly.

My birthday was predated a little bit to Sunday, since everyone has more time on sunday.  Aldine and I went over to Barbie’s house for my birthday party.  Barbie made ham loaf and all the fixins that I like and my birthday cake was a black raspberry pie.  Barbie knows what I like.  When everyone was full of good food, they brought out a heap of mail from my descendants, that they had been saving.  They demanded that I read it all out loud and pass around the pictures.  I never had so much mail all at one time and had so many say such nice things about me.  Fathers usually have to be dead to get so much favorable fan mail.  It was so much fun I would like to be 80 again next year.

I have a new status symbol as a Family History Expert.  I have been working as a substitute at the Mormon Library for several years.  Just recently they gave me a promotion, and I am now a member of the regular staff.  There was no pay raise.  Everyone on the staff gets the same pay, nothing.  But I feel well paid in fun and being able to associate with the nicest, smartest people in the whole world.

I have been working on several projects.  One project is to gather data for an eventual history of Butler Township, St. Clair Township, MO.  A lot of your ancestors came from that place.  I doubt I will ever live so long as to write the book, but maybe you and your mother can take over where I leave off.

I have a working version of a program I wrote in “C” language that I hope will combine census records in a new useful way.  I have entered a lot of data from the 1900, 1910, and 1920 census of Butler township in a raw data base.  I hope to do the 1880 census for Butler Twp this winter.  The new idea of my program is that it will combine a sorted version of the combined censuses so the people will be grouped together.  That way, you will be able to see on a single screen how a person ages and how their situation changed as the decades pass.  I also have entered a lot of WW1 draft data and a lot of marriage records for Butler Twp and other parts of St. Clair County.

I made photocopies of the original draft records for your great grandfather WEARS and your great grandfather COLLEY.  I will enclose a photo-copy of the one for GGfather WEARS.  Both Doris and I existed at that time as mere embryos, so I imagine the registration of prospective fathers for military service was something of a shock to the prospective mothers.  Now as I take a closer look at the copy, I see that Doris had already been born.  She was born in August and I wasn’t born until October.

Just a short time ago a correspondent sent me some new material about our SAYLOR family.  The best way to explain this is to make an abbreviated Ahnentafel which I will extend a bit for later purpose:

1. Gregg MATTOCKS
2. Leon MATTOCKS
3. Carol Lee COLLEY
6. Earl COLLEY
12. James Alvin COLLEY
13. Vida MILLER
26. Walter MILLER

[Earl makes a mistake here.  Catherine Gilley was the mother, not the wife of Walter Miller.]

27. Catharine GILLEY b 2 May 1840 Washington Co. TN, d MO
52. William MILLER
54. Abraham (Absalom) GILLIS (GILLEY) married 12 Oct 1837 Washington Co. TN
55. Mary SAILOR (SAYLOR)
104. Henry MILLER
105. Hannah BISHOP b Chester District, SC ca1884; d Benton Co. MO after 1850
110. John SAYLOR b 1775 Lebanon Twp. Lancaster Co. PA; d TN; m 26 Dec 1797 Rockingham Co. TN
111. Betsy KYSOR
210. James BISHOP b PA; d Hopkins Co. KY
222. Henry KISOR (KYSOR)
420. Nicholas BISHOP b DE, d Chester District SC.

Items 111. and 222. I have long suspected were true, but the new data I received gives me much more confidence.  The marriage of John SAYLOR and Betsy KYSOR is recorded in the book “Rockingham Co., VA Marriages 1778-1816” by Strickler.  The book can be found in many Genealogical libraries.  The new data I got goes back several generations and says the SAYLORs were Mennonites from Switzerland.  I haven’t yet examined this story well enough to want to give it my blessing.  I sent in a request to the Main Mormon Library in Salt Lake City for a film that I hope will add some detailed proof to the story.

While I was in the process of writing this letter the mail man delivered our mail.  I received my copy of the quarterly Bulletin of the Chester District Genealogical Society.  I have subscribed to it for many years and sometimes contribute material for them to print.  In this issue is one thing of particular interest to us.  I will enclose photo-copies of three pages.  The interesting part is the inset on page 112, but I copied the preceding and following page to include some background.

Henry BISHOP was an older brother of our James BISHOP (James BISHOP is number 210 on the previous Ahnentafel).  Henry BISHOP was a Captain in the Patriot army.  The whole BISHOP family with all their Patriot neighbors formed a refugee train of ox carts and such to retreat from the British and Tory threat.  They headed for Charlotte, NC where there was a stronger Patriot army for protection.  The men with the refugee train went to attack the British at Hanging Rock to turn them away from attacking the refugee women and children.  Henry BISHOP was wounded at the Hanging Rock battle.  He was carried in the refugee train to Charlotte, where he died of his wounds.  I have long searched for additional records about the battle and the refugee experience.  The British burned houses and killed all the live-stock that the refugees could not carry along with them.  I suppose most historians did not think the battle at Hanging Rock was very important, because not enough soldiers were killed there.

I often scan the data you sent me a long time ago, and think how much time you have invested.  Since I live in the Northeast, I have been aware that our County Library may have some sources that have not been readily available to you.  I hope to take advantage of that, but I never seem to stay on one subject very long.  I keep getting diverted by peripheral quests.

I hope your mother can soon get her life back on track and have time to pursue our mutual interest in family history.  She tells me that property values in the peninsula are so poor that she expects a difficult time in selling her house.  We have the same surplus real estate situation here, and I would have a difficult time selling my house.  I would really like to avoid the tribulations of being a home owner and move back to Columbia, MO.  The Missouri Historical Society is there and the MO University Library.  As an alumnus of the University and an ex-teacher, I would be eligible for using a lot of the School facilities.

Tell me about the computer you are now using.  I still have my old 386 DX machine.  For a long time I also had another machine on my desk based on a 286 mother board that I bought second hand for $29.  But I could not run WINDOWS on that.  I resisted WINDOWS long after most of my friends were using it, but almost all software now requires windows.  When JUNO (no cost internet access) was offered it was the last straw.  JUNO requires WINDOWS.  Being too much of a tightwad to pay for “Intel inside”, I upgraded to a K5 processor made by AMD.  It works great, and I don’t see how paying the price for a Pentium would have given me any better service.  Other components are also gettig cheap, so I have 32 Meg of ROM, a slow PC disk reader, and a 2.5 Gig hard drive.

I really make good use of having two computers side by side.  I do a lot of writing.  I use the old 386 as if it were a dedicated word processor, and use the K5 machine to look up data as the subject of my writing demands.  It is possible to switch windows on a single screen to get that result, but my system allows me to have two full screens visible at the same time.

I would be glad to hear of your adventures, but I know that like all of us, your time is fully engaged.  If the next I hear from you is my 90th birthday card, I will understand.  But I will be pleased to hear sooner.

With the affection I have for all my extensive clan,

Old grandfather

Earl

Memories of Grandpa’s Fish Camp

2 May 2009 Leave a comment

Source: Ma Fisk [Lola Jordan], “Memories of Grandpa’s Fish Camp,” Illinois Sports Outdoors (February 1997), page 22.

[page 22]

At age 84, there are many fond memories of family and times long gone. My lifetime of outdoor memories began on a homestead on the prairies of Montana and have paddled along with me on the lakes and rivers of Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Minnesota.

But what I am writing about now are my precious days of camping on the Kankakee River in the 1920’s with Grandpa, Grandma, and my three sisters. We granddaughters ranged in age from three to ten. I was the ten year old.

When the cruel disease took our mother away, Grandpa and Grandma Mattocks took us in and our father traveled to the big city to find work. We would only see our dad on weekends, but our grandparents had lots of love to spare.

I think most of Grandpa’s life was spent outside. He was thin, wiry, and strong. Every summer before school was out, Grandpa would go out along the Kankakee River scouting for a campsite. It would not be a fancy cottage. Sometimes it would be just one room downstairs and up a ladder to one room upstairs, or often no cottage at all, just an area for tents. There would be a large one for sleeping and another for storage.

Grandpa would clear the land by the riverbank, making stacks and stacks of firewood, and then spade the soil to plant a big garden. When he had erected our table and benches under a canopy and had a big grate ready for cooking, he would get his boat ready for fishing.

After the end of the school year, the uncles would load up Grandma and us girls along with the grocery staples, dishes, pots and pans, bedding, and clothes. Then off we’d go to join Grandpa on the banks of the river.

In western Indiana near Roselawn, Shelby and Thayer, the Kankakee River had been dredged and straightened so there were huge sand hills and extra oxbow sloughs of water from the old channels…. an ideal place for adventurous children. It seems we played and swam all day! Bathing suits were the usual attire. Up and on the go in the daytime, in bed at dark.

Grandpa was a great outdoorsman, mostly a fisherman. He seemed to know where to fish, when to fish, and what bait to use. He would put our lines out or sit along the bank. Sometimes he might travel little up river. There was no motor, just oars or his hand made a paddle.

Occasionally, a relative stopped by with an order of extra groceries. We also would get eggs and milk from a local farmer and vegetables from our garden, but we mostly ate fish…. lots of fish! Since I was the oldest child, I had to help Grandpa with the garden and fishing. I remember once we went to a slough and there were as many mud turtles as fish. How I hated those mud turtles! They’d swallow your hook so you would have to stretch out their neck and stomp on their back to retrieve your hook. Grandpa put the fish in his wire net basket and the turtle carcasses were thrown aside for the wild creatures of the night to clean up. We sure didn’t want them to come alive and bite again. Grandpa teased that I was fishing for turtles and accidentally caught fish.

Another time Grandpa took his spear along some shallow back water. The water was very clear and we had to be very quiet. “Don’t move, don’t move.” Then all at once Grandpa’s spear went sailing out! I couldn’t believe he could throw it so far and impale a big buffalo or carp. I can close my eyes right now and see him pulling up his boots to wade out after that flopping handle with a big fish attached to the prongs of the spear! Holding the fish to the bottom, he would ease his way to the shoreline. Then the water would explode as he would swing the thrashing carp out onto solid ground! I can keenly remember being very proud of Grandpa!

I have always loved the outdoors and the times that were shared there. In those carefree years of childhood, my sisters and I were happy and healthy. Thank you, Grandpa and Grandma! I believe you knew how to care of us four little girls after having raised two girls and seven boys of your own.

World War I Draft Registration Card: Fred W. Wears

29 April 2009 Leave a comment

Source: World War I Draft Registration Card (Form 1), 1917-1918: Fred W. Wears.

978 420-32

Form 1        REGISTRATION CARD        No. 171

1   Name in full Fred    W. WEARS Age, in yrs.  30
(Given name) (Family name)
2   Home address Lowry City Mo
(No.) (Street) (City) (State)
3   Date of birth May 4 1887
(Month) (Day) (Year)

4   Are you (1) a natural-born citizen, (2) a naturalized citizen, (3) an alien, (4) or have you declared your intention (specify which)?  Natural-born citizen

5   Where were you born? Henry Co. Mo USA
(Town) (State) (Nation)

6   If not a citizen, of what country are you a citizen or subject?

7   What is your present trade, occupation, or office?  Barber  29

8   By whom employed?  own employer
Where employed?  Lowry City Mo

9   Have you a father, mother, wife, child under 12, or a sister or brother under 12, solely dependent on you for support (specify which)?  wife & child

10  Married or single (which)?  Married Race (specify which)?  Caucasian

11  What military service have you had?  Rank  No ; branch        ; years        ; Nation or State

12  Do you claim exemption from draft (specify grounds)?  wife & child to support

I affirm that I have verified above answers and that they are true.

C

Fred W WEARS
(Signature or mark)

If person is of
African descent,
tear off this
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